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Recently our native advertising partner StackAdapt popped into our Salt Lake City office to discuss the latest and greatest features their team is working on. For those of you who are not familiar StackAdapt is the premier native advertising platform based in Toronto, Canada, and no big deal they’ve been featured in Forbes. Their product offering is led by native articles with video and display products launched in the past year. While we can’t discuss everything Michelle and Eli covered during out lunch and learn. We can say StackAdapt has a lot of great features launching this coming quarter and year.

As advertisers look for alternate channels to Facebook and Google we predict a continued shift to native advertising. Native’s metrics are stacking up, if not exceeding those of other channels and can track time spent on site (when using StackAdapt) no matter if you are using native articles, video or display.

Is native advertising included in your brand’s campaign spend? If not email us at content@pennapowers.com and we can peek at where your audience is online and where you should be.

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We recently attended the 2018 Silicon Slope Tech Summit to learn about the state of tech in Utah. The conference covered everything from gender equality to the entrepreneurial spirit. Here are a few of our favorite takeaways from the conference:

Relevance is key

Facebook’s Vice President of Global Communications Caryn Marooney stressed the importance of relevance in content marketing. If you can’t get relevance right, it doesn’t matter who you are or what you can offer. If you can get relevance dialed in, that’s the real ticket.

Don’t mistake motion for progress

Another highlight from Marooney’s talk centered on progress. She paraphrased Bill Gates’ famous quote: “People overestimate what they can do in a year and underestimate what they can do in ten. You need to put a building block on it every day.” However, Marooney stressed the importance of staying simple; be intentional in what you create. “The longer you are in business and the more successful you are, the harder people will pull at you to become more complicated,” Marooney said.

Your employees deserve transparency

Allbirds CEO attributed the success of his company to the employees. He stressed giving employees access to the greater vision in order for them to make better decisions. If your employees are truly invested in your vision, they are being driven by the right reasons. As soon as money becomes the motivating factor, you’re going to be paying a lot and the employees are going to jump ship.

Utah is the place to be

Although shadowed by Silicon Valley, the Silicon Slopes is operating at optimal density right now. Because of its competitive tech culture, Utah’s talent pool is creating something magical in the state. Multiple Utah-based CEOs agree that the state and its quality of life are the driving factors for success. “Almost everyone I know who comes here says ‘I’ll give it a little bit of time.’ Utah is a wonderful place that wins you over,” said Experticity CEO Tom Stockham.

We loved attending the 2018 Silicon Slope Tech Summit and look forward to the presenters they bring next year.

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Varick Media

Campaign minimums got you down?

Although all clients and campaigns are significant, they don’t always have budgets for massive campaigns. While there may be a perfect media channel for your campaign, it may not be executable due to minimum budget constraints. Varick Media is one of many great partners who have created solutions to this very problem.

Who is Varick Media?

Varick Media Management LLC offers digital advertising consulting services. It provides campaign planning, research, consumer insight, campaign monitoring and measurement services. The company was founded in 2008 and is based in New York, New York. Varick Media operates as a subsidiary of MDC Partners Inc., a marketing and communications network. MDC Partners has 50+ advertising, public relations, branding, digital, social and event marketing agencies under its umbrella.

What is the technology?

In 2012 Varick Media Management built its own in-house digital monitoring product.

That product, called The Lens, is paired with an internal pixel server so that Varick can track its online display and video ad campaigns across the various demand-side platforms and plug the resulting data into one central data repository that their clients control.

In October of 2015, Varick Media released Alveo—a planning, buying and reporting platform. Operating originally as more of an internal trading desk, Alveo can now be used by Varick’s clients to manage and visualize data as well as access reports across multiple campaigns. Alveo is available as a managed service “with all of the access and data of a self-service offering,” described Jim Caruso, SVP of product and client strategy at Varick. While agency trading desks aren’t renowned for open access and transparency, Caruso said, “Alveo was designed to be agnostic across media channels, DSPs and inventory sources.”

What is the solution?

Combining both The Lens (DMP) and Alveo (trade desk) technology, Varick’s clients can access inventory through a robust channel inventory and layer with premium custom audiences to manage through one platform. This married opportunity allows for accurate performance and audience insights across multiple channels. Because Varick is a subsidiary of umbrella network MDC Partners, campaign minimums can be achievable for a wider set of clients.

 

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Q1 Media

A lot of innovative media and technology providers pass through the halls of Penna Powers. We’ve decided to showcase some of these partners, tell you a little bit about what they do and/or how they have been a part of campaign solutions.

“We could always open up the targeting a little bit”

Hyper-targeted campaigns can be difficult to deliver on the local level. Too often local campaigns are faced with an inability to scale against the targeting that has been sold in. Common “solutions” to this under delivery is to open up the targeting, eliminating the customization that a campaign requires. Q1 Media has a solution that historically has delivered without compromise.

Q1 Media established their business 14 years ago in Austin, Texas. They recognized at that time that smaller publishers would need help moving into the digital media age and monetizing their websites. They saw this as an opportunity to begin establishing partnerships with publishers to develop custom digital media placements. In return, Q1 Media received premium inventory not available anywhere else.

As Q1 has grown, so has their breadth of publisher partnerships and targeting capabilities. One of their relatively recent partnerships includes targeting capabilities using polygon location targeting. Polygon targeting allows an advertiser to map an area -or multiple areas- to expose those within, to the campaign messaging. In our case, we used this technology to map specific road ways. This targeting allowed our campaign to capture all the people who had traveled through the mapped area.

With this captured audience pool, we could serve media to them in the mapped area as well as save them to serve later throughout the entire campaign. Additional customization included audience segmentation to deliver custom messaging. Q1 Media proved to an excellent vendor, in combination with the Polygon targeting and premium publisher inventory, our campaign earned an engagement rate 8x above the industry average.

Thank you Carlos Casas and Drew Warriner, we are excited to see what’s next.

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Penna Powers is celebrating Shark Week! While considered a bona fide holiday for many, we’re using the cherished event to drive awareness for our client Zero Fatalities. Over the course of Utah’s “100 Deadliest Days,” the majority of deaths on Utah roads happen between Memorial Day and Labor Day. We’re creating original content for every single deadliest day in order to decrease deadly driving behaviors. For Shark Week, Penna Powers created Snapchat and Instagram Stories ads for Zero Fatalities. Utilizing these ad placements will be a first in Utah, with each social channel finally opening their ad platforms to agencies of all sizes.

In our research process, one thing we noticed was Utahns did not realize the extreme risk of buckling up when you’re in a car crash. Statistics from the CDC show that you have a 50 percent chance of surviving a car crash if you don’t wear a seat belt. However, many Utahns still refuse to buckle up when they get in the car.

Kenny Hammond, senior art director, designed the Snapchat and Instagram Stories ad to coincide with our “What are the Odds?” campaign that plays to the availability heuristic principle. Our goal is that Utahns will realize the gravity of not wearing a seat belt. The ads started running Sunday, July 23 and will run until Sunday, July 30.

At Penna Powers, we strategize media plans backed by research to show ads only where the audience interacts with content on a daily basis. We jumped on the chance the use the new Instagram Story and Snapchat ad placements to reach the key millennial demographic of 25-to-34-year-olds in Utah. Using the shark creative, we are able to split-test the two channels against each other with identical spends to see which performs best. For this flight, we will compare CPM, CPC, and CPV.

This Shark Week, Penna Powers hopes you realize the true danger at hand: not wearing a seat belt. Trust us, not wearing a seat belt is a risk you don’t want to take.

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Content marketing is exploding. It makes sense, as a written article or produced video can convey more information and users actually choose to read/watch it. Companies are willing to pay content marketers, including YouTubers, big dollars to have them promote their product.

So how much do they really make? Well, let’s look first at how much companies pay them to promote a product and secondly let’s look at how much YouTube pays them to run ads.

How Much do You Pay a YouTuber to Promote Your Product. Obviously this varies widely depending on the YouTuber’s audience and the marketing objective. In general, YouTubers typically charge around $10,000 per 100,000 views. It’s difficult to predict how many views a native video will get, so that is the risk an advertiser takes.

How Much YouTube Pays YouTubers Per View. Once the YouTuber links Google AdSense to their channel, they make 68% of the ad revenue (see Google AdSense Revenue Share). YouTube charges advertisers when a viewer watches 30 seconds or more of the ad, and typically charges around $.18 per view (see How Much Do Ads on YouTube Cost). Only about 15% of viewers will be counted as a “paid view” since many of them skip.

So if you have 1,000 views to your video and 15% actually watch the ad, then you would have 150 paid views. At $.18 per view, this would equate to $27 total charged to the advertiser. As the content creator you get 68% of that, so you would average around $18 per 1,000 views.

Here is it another way:

1,000 views –> 150 views of people completing the ad

$.18 per view x 150 views = $27 charged to advertiser

$27 advertiser charge x 68% revenue share = $18 paid to content creator per 1,000 views

Who are the Top YouTubers? In 2014, the top YouTuber made $4.9 million unboxing toys. Yes that’s right, the whole channel is just her unboxing Disney toys. Her top video, Play Doh Sparkle Princess, has garnered 217 million views. Other examples include PewDiePie, which made $4 million in 2014 and LittleBabyBum, which made $3.5 million. If this makes you question everything you’ve done in your life, you’re not alone.

Should Marketers Pay YouTubers to Make Videos? To say it depends is kind of a cop-out, so I’m going to compare the cost per thousand views to if you just ran an online video ad instead.

Making Videos. From above, you could calculate that to have a YouTuber make a video and post it to their channel you would be paying roughly $10,000 for 100,000 views, which breaks down to $100 per 1,000 views.

Running Video Ads. If you opted to just run an ad on their channel, you would pay $27 per 1,000 views (but only really get 150 completed views). To get 1,000 completed views it would cost $405.

Both are good options. Video is much more visual than any other media so if you’re debating between the two you have a good problem. Having a YouTuber produce a video is comparatively less expensive, but you give up creative control and cannot know how successful the video will be. Also you are limited to just their channel, so you may need to do multiple of these deals. Some of the pros are that you get a customized piece of content that doesn’t feel like an ad, and oftentimes these channels reach audiences that don’t consume general mass media. Paid ads are just that – paid ads, and oftentimes users feel inconvenienced when forced to watch them. However, the targeting is great and can oftentimes tie into your larger marketing strategy.

Need help deciding on your video content strategy? Let us help!

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Contributed by Jason Alleger

YouTube is the second-largest search engine in the world, trailing only Google. There are over two billion YouTube videos streamed every day, and advertisers want a piece of this viewership pie.

So how much does it cost to run an ad on YouTube?

YouTube advertisers pay per view of their ad, with an average cost-per-view ranging between $.10 – $.30. The views also count toward your overall YouTube views.

On YouTube there are four standard types of ad formats:

  • In-search – an ad shows up above the YouTube search results.
  • In-slate – an ad shows up in the suggested videos after your video ended.
  • In-display – an ad shows up on the suggested videos beside the video you are watching.
  • In-stream – an ad plays before you can watch your video.

The pricing varies slightly per ad unit, with in-display ads ranging towards the higher end ($.30) and in-search toward the lower end ($.10).

Advertisers can target viewers by age, gender, location or by what types of videos they like to watch on YouTube. Generally, advertisers pay incrementally more for focused target audiences.

For example, if the Utah Department of Transportation (UDOT) wanted Utahns to learn how to drive a new type of intersection in Salt Lake City, it would only want to target men and women 16+ years old within a 10-mile radius of Salt Lake City. It would probably select more in-stream video ad units so the locals could watch how to drive the intersection, as well as in-search for anyone searching for driving tips in the area. At an average cost-per-view of $.20, UDOT would pay around $2,000 to educate 10,000 people how to drive the intersection.

Overall, YouTube ads are an excellent means of boosting your web presence at an affordable rate. For most ad units, potential customers actually CHOOSE to watch your advertisement. Also, the overall boost in views gives more credibility to your company and gives it a better chance of showing up organically in YouTube or other search engines.

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